PhD studentship in Diabetes Care

  • Anywhere

Website MyBCU Birmingham City University

GRTA Studentship – Exploring Diabetes Awareness within the UK Construction, Manufacturing and Transport Industries (REF: GRTA-NMW-DIABETES)

Contact for informal enquiries: Dr Anne Phillips (Anne.Phillips@bcu.ac.uk)

Diabetes is a global epidemic that poses enormous risks to personal and public health. Diabetes effects nearly 5 million people in the UK and costs the NHS 10 billion pounds per year of which 8 billion pounds is being spent to treat preventable complications (Baxter et al, 2016).

People from more deprived communities experience higher levels of diabetes and complications related to diabetes (Scott, et al., 2017). The impact of Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) like income, employment, and education upon people with diabetes are often overlooked (WHO, 2021), even though these can be significant barriers to optimal diabetes care for people on low incomes (Frier et al., 2019). People with diabetes employed in construction, manufacturing and transportation sectors have higher prevalence of diabetes (Riva et al., 2016). Occupational barriers have been linked with sub-optimal diabetes management and lower levels of engagement with healthcare services (Khan, et al., 2011). Diabetes can lead to reduced productivity in the workforce (Afroz et al., 2020; Hird et al., 2019). More research on how to reduce the incidence rate of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications within these groups are needed (Tönnies et al., 2020).

This study seeks to explore approaches that employers and employees within the United Kingdom construction, manufacturing and/or transportation sectors are implementing to address the risks relating to diabetes within their workforce.

The project would be supported by the Centre for Social Care, Health and Related Research: Knowledge to Care cluster. It would be supervised by researchers from the Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences: School of Nursing and Midwifery and School of Health Sciences, Department of Public and Community Health.

In the Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant role, the candidate will be based in the Department of Post-qualifying Practice. They will be expected to contribute to teaching and related activity for our suite of programmes in diabetes care.  For that reason, preference will be given to candidates who are registered health care professionals with experience in diabetes.

References
  • Afroz A, Hird TR, Zomer E, Owen A, Chen L, Ademi Z, Liew D, Magliano DJ, Billah B. The impact of diabetes on the productivity and economy of Bangladesh. BMJ Glob Health. 2020 Jun;5(6):e002420. doi: 10.1136/bmjgh-2020-002420. PMID: 32532757; PMCID: PMC7295429. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32532757/
  • Baxter M, Hudson R, Mahon J, Barlett C, Samyshkin Y, Alexiou D, Hex N. Estimating the impact of better management of glycaemic control in adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes on the number of clinical complications and the associated financial benefit. Diabet Med. 2016 Nov;33(11):1575-1581. doi: 10.1111/dme.13062. Epub 2016 Apr 15. PMID: 26773733.
  • Hird TR, Zomer E, Owen A, Chen L, Ademi Z, Magliano DJ, Liew D. The impact of diabetes on productivity in China. Diabetologia. 2019 Jul;62(7):1195-1203. doi: 10.1007/s00125-019-4875-4. Epub 2019 Apr 27. PMID: 31030220. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31030220/
  • Khan H, Lasker SS, Chowdhury TA. Exploring reasons for very poor glycaemic control in patients with Type 2 diabetes. Prim Care Diabetes. 2011 Dec;5(4):251-5. doi: 10.1016/j.pcd.2011.07.001. Epub 2011 Jul 22. PMID: 21782539. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21782539/
  • Riva MM, Santini M, Borleri D, Trevisan R, Mosconi G. Diabetes mellitus in critical jobs. Med Lav. 2016 Jul 26;107(4):293-9. Italian. PMID: 27464902. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27464902/
  • Scott A, Chambers D, Goyder E, O’Cathain A (2017) Socioeconomic inequalities in mortality, morbidity and diabetes management for adults with type 1 diabetes: A systematic review. PLoS ONE 12(5): e0177210. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0177210
  • Tönnies T, Hoyer A, Brinks R. Productivity-adjusted life years lost due to type 2 diabetes in Germany in 2020 and 2040. Diabetologia. 2021 Jun;64(6):1288-1297. doi: 10.1007/s00125-021-05409-3. Epub 2021 Mar 4. PMID: 33665686; PMCID: PMC8099797. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33665686/
  • World Health Organisation (WHO), 2021. Social Determinants of Health to Advance Equity. [online] Available at:
Funding Information

This 48 month (4 year) full-time fully-funded GRTA Studentship comprises of two elements:

1) 0.75 tax-free stipend of £11,707 per annum (paid monthly). The bursary is renewable annually for up to 48 months in total, subject to you making satisfactory progression within your PhD research.

2) 0.25 fixed term contract of employment (Assistant Lecturer) – renewable for up to 48 months in total, subject to satisfactory performance and progression within your PhD research. The pro rata salary for 2021-22 is £7,708 (paid monthly).

This funding model also includes a FT Home fees studentship (£4,500 for 2021-22) for up to 4 years, subject to you making satisfactory progression within your PhD research.

This opportunity is open to UK, EU and Overseas applicants. International fee status applicants will be required to meet the difference in fee costs from their own funds

How to apply

To apply, please complete an online application. In place of a personal statement applicants are required to upload a research proposal explaining their ideas about the selected project topic and how it might be studied. Please ensure you state the project reference GRTA-NMW-DIABETES on your proposal form.

Deadline for applications

The closing date for applications is 23.59 on Friday 10th December 2021 for a May 2022 start.

To apply for this job please visit www.bcu.ac.uk.