Type 2 diabetes and vascular dementia links explored

By Editor
9th July 2018
Research, Type 2 diabetes

Factors associated with type 2 diabetes in people with vascular dementia have been outlined by researchers investigating the links between the conditions.

Clinicians should encourage people with dementia to receive regular glucose impairment screening if they are female, have low socioeconomic status or have renal or metabolic conditions, the research carried out in Taiwan concluded.

The population-based cross-sectional study, carried out by researchers from Kaohsiung Medical University and published by BMC Endocrine Disorders, explored the factors associated with type 2 diabetes in people with dementia.

They were looking for answers behind how type 2 diabetes mellitus is linked to cognitive decline and dementia.

The medical records of more than 40,000 people vascular dementia identified in Taiwan’s 1997 to 2008 National Health Insurance Research Database were examined and divided into whether they had type 2 diabetes or not.

Eleven comorbidities were identified and categorised into four groups: cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, digestive system diseases, renal and metabolic system diseases, and cancer. The associations of these factors with type 2 diabetes were explored through “multivaraible logistic regression”.

Summarising the results, the researchers said: “Of the patients with dementia, 22.5 per cent had DM [type 2 diabetes]. Associated with a higher likelihood of DM in this population were female sex (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.44, 95 per cent confidence interval [CI]: 1.36–1.52), young age (range of adjusted OR: 0.55–1.13), low income (range of adjusted OR: 1.09–1.18), and renal and metabolic system diseases (OR: 2.81, 95 per cent CI: 2.64–2.98).”

They concluded: “The findings of this study suggest that clinicians should encourage patients with dementia to receive regular glucose impairment screening if they are female, have low socioeconomic status, or have renal or metabolic diseases.”

To access the study, click here.

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