Needle gadget eradicates insulin errors by 20 per cent

By Editor
15th February 2017
Latest news, Medical devices Research

Insulin injection errors can be lowered by 20 per cent by using a special medication device, a new study has found.

A tea from Cardiff University carried out research on a gadget called NeedleBay, which was developed to help make the lives of people with diabetes easier, when it comes to preparing their insulin needles.

The device allows the user to  prepare their medication a week in advance. The design of the product also allows the person to see clearly how many needles they have left.

Over two thirds of the 226 who took part in the study said they had previously made mistakes when it came to their insulin injections.

But, the research showed 20 per cent less medication errors were made after using NeedleBay. The device also hugely increased people’s perceptions of controlling their injections as before using the gadget 20 per cent of the participants said they felt in control, but afterwards that percentage had gone up to 99 per cent.

Lead researcher and professor of health sciences, Professor Molly Courtenay, said: “It’s very important for those with insulin-dependent diabetes to manage their medication appropriately. If glucose levels aren’t maintained there is a risk of complications including vision loss, kidney failure or cardiovascular disease.

“Our results show that insulin delivery devices are hugely beneficial in overcoming both physical and psychological barriers to effective insulin therapy. Use of the device increased adherence by 50 per cent.”

As well as the heath benefits, Professor Courtenay said the device could also save money for the health service.

She added: “Given that four-fifths of NHS diabetes spending goes on treating complications caused by poor insulin adherence, the potential savings, and benefits for patients, are significant.”

Dr Emily Burns, research communications manager at Diabetes UK said: “It’s promising how helpful some people found NeedleBay. Hundreds of thousands of people in the UK with type 1 and type 2 diabetes treat their condition with insulin, in order to regulate blood glucose levels and prevent complications like kidney disease, amputation and blindness.”

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